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Good Grief Network

Good Grief Network

Our friends at the Good Grief Network lead a 10-step program focused on personal resilience and empowerment in a chaotic climate:

All We Can Save

All We Can Save

Are you hungry for deeper dialogue about the climate crisis and building community around solutions? Check out All We Can Save.

Sharing our Stories

Sharing our Stories

Moving through story Storytelling is my favorite tool for exploring complexity and meaning. I started this platform to ask: How can we support each other to transform our eco-anxieties into meaningful action?   How can stories help us connect to each other and to the...

Indigenous Rights

Indigenous Rights

“Our identities as Indigenous peoples are inextricably tied to the lands, waters, and ecosystems we come from. As the climate crisis continues to worsen, our communities are experiencing increasingly dramatic changes that disrupt our life ways and our rights, despite the fact we are least responsible for it,” stated ICA Executive Director Eriel Tchekwie Deranger.

Caring at the End of the World

Caring at the End of the World

Meghan and Joni were feeling overwhelmed, afraid, and angry about the state of the world, and they decided to come together to reflect on what they could control: how we take care of ourselves, each other, and the earth – even when it feels like the end of the world.

Still the Mind

Still the Mind

Find a comfortable place to sit or lie, close your eyes, and let Mary’s voice help you navigate to a more peaceful place.

Let Me Out

Let Me Out

Mindful Musings by Mary Prefontaine Sometimes in the quiet of the morning, I am visited by another me - the one that plays with prose and is quietly attentive to what is patiently waiting to be invited out to be with me. Sometimes it shows up as a rant, or an...

Eco-Anxiety Reflection Guide

Eco-Anxiety Reflection Guide

What frameworks are useful for making sense of eco-anxiety? Stories are all about grounding information in context. We experience eco-anxiety individually and collectively, but everyone comes from a different context. Learning more about the broader context – the bigger story – can help you identify other characters in the story who may be experiencing these feelings in a different way. We may be used to starting the story with “Who am I in this story?” but it’s more important to ask “When am I in this story?”

Eco-Anxious Enneagram

Eco-Anxious Enneagram

The enneagram model is useful here because it provides a framework for thinking about how different people interact with the world around them. What feels stressful to one personality might be framed as an exciting challenge for another. Different personalities have different primary emotions about climate change, and I think this gives us a chance to think about what healthy growth, or a sustainable response to the climate crisis, might look like for each number.

Climate Change Isn’t the First Existential Threat

Climate Change Isn’t the First Existential Threat

Mary reminds us to put those feelings into context. Because while I may be encountering these feelings of existential dread, fear, and anger about my future for the first time, there are others who have already faced the apocalypse.